Records of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1850-1960.
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Records of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1850-1960. by National American Woman Suffrage Association.

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Published by Library of Congress, Photoduplication Division in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Women -- Suffrage -- United States -- History -- Guidebooks.

Book details:

The Physical Object
Paginationp. 67-121 ;
Number of Pages121
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22265647M

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  The 19th Amendment guarantees American women the right to vote. Achieving this milestone required a lengthy and difficult struggle; victory took decades of agitation. Beginning in the midth century, woman suffrage supporters lectured, wrote, marched, lobbied, and practiced civil disobedience to achieve what many Americans considered radical change. Founded in by the merger of the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association. Records comprising correspondence, a subject file relating chiefly to state and local suffrage organizations and leaders in the movement, scrapbooks prepared by Ida Porter Boyer documenting activities in the women's rights movement (), and miscellaneous .   The records of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) span the years from to but are most numerous for the period to The collection consists of approximat items (52, images), most of which were digitized from 73 microfilm reels. The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) Collection is a library of nearly books and pamphlets documenting the suffrage campaign that were collected between and by members of NAWSA and donated to the Rare Books Division of the Library of Congress on November 1,

  Women's long and difficult struggle for suffrage is well documented in the Manuscript Division's collections. The records of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and the National Woman's Party (NWP) show that suffrage was achieved only after the NAWSA abandoned its emphasis on state legislation and joined the NWP in a push for a federal amendment, . The National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) was an organization formed on Febru , to advocate in favor of women's suffrage in the United was created by the merger of two existing organizations, the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA) and the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA). Its membership, which was about seven .   In Votes For Women, Jean H. Baker has assembled an impressive collection of new scholarship on the struggle of American women for the suffrage. Each of the eleven essays illuminates some aspect of the long battle that lasted from the s to the passage of the suffrage . National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) Records. Library of Congress Exhibit: Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote. Library of Congress Research Guide: 19th Amendment. Library of Congress Subject Heading(s): League of Women Voters. National American Woman Suffrage Association. National Association of Colored Women (U.S.).

Formed in by the merger of the National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association. From the description of National American Woman Suffrage Association records, bulk (). (Unknown). WorldCat record id: Votes for Women: Selections from the National American Woman Suffrage Association Collection, By Popular Demand: "Votes for Women" Suffrage Pictures, Women of Protest: Photographs from the Records of the National Woman's Party. [Cambridge, Mass.]: Harvard University Library, Enter suffrage or suffragists as a "subject" search. Note that the resulting records only include low resolution, thumbnail images. Votes for Women: Selections from the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) Collection, [online]. Washington, D.C.: Library of. The American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) was a single-issue national organization formed in in Boston. The AWSA lobbied state governments to enact laws granting or expanding women's right to vote in the United States. One of the AWSA most prominent leader, Lucy Stone, began publishing a newspaper in called the Woman's was co-founded by an African American woman.